The 200 m World Record: 19.32 s

Excerpt from : Mureika, J. R., Canadian Journal of Physics 81 (7), 895-910 (2003)

These splits are the results of a simulation using the model presented in the journal referenced above. The simulation results are presented in the first Table, and are compared to the reported results in the second Table. The difference between the two tends to average around 0.04 s, with the noted exception at 146.42 m. This mismatch is most likely due to a clerical error, a methodological error, or combination of both.

d (m) Split (s) v (ms$^{-1}$) $\Delta_{10}$
10 1.766 8.426 1.766
20 2.852 9.872 1.086
30 3.823 10.673 0.971
40 4.738 11.138 0.915
50 5.625 11.402 0.887
60 6.496 11.535 0.871
70 7.361 11.581 0.865
80 8.225 11.566 0.864
90 9.091 11.506 0.866
100 9.964 11.416 0.873
110 10.844 11.301 0.880
120 11.733 11.222 0.889
130 12.626 11.172 0.893
140 13.524 11.084 0.898
150 14.431 10.969 0.907
160 15.348 10.834 0.917
170 16.277 10.684 0.929
180 17.220 10.523 0.943
190 18.178 10.354 0.958
200 19.152 10.180 0.974

At sea-level in 0-wind conditions, the time would translate to $19.219 + 0.161 = 19.380~$s (always assuming a 0.161 s reaction). Had it been run in Mexico City, the model suggests a 19.172 s in still wind, and 19.099 s with a straight +2 ms$^{-1}$ tail-wind. Furthermore, letting $\xi \rightarrow 0$, at sea-level the ``straight track'' equivalent of his 10.13 s split would theoretically be 9.909 s, with a straight 200 m clocking of 18.950 s (note that the world record for a straight 200 m is reported as 19.5 s, wind 1.84 ms$^{-1}$, for American sprinter Tommie Smith in San Jose, 7 May 1966).

The second table contains the corresponding theoretical 50 and 100 m interval analysis. Note the incredible split of 8.786 s between 40-140 m. Although such ``running-start'' performances are rarely clocked, track-lore has it that Carl Lewis marked an 8.86 s leg in the 4x100m relay [ATFS 2001 Annual, Peter Matthews (ed.)]. If this simulation is accurate, this constitutes one of the fastest 100 m intervals run by any athlete in history! The corresponding simulated 150 m split would be 14.592 s, officially reported as 14.60 s.

Table: Comparison with recorded data from Drut, G., Revue des entraineurs francais d'athlétisme (Spécial) 143 (July/August 1996). Rounding procedure is IAAF standard.
d (m) Recorded (s) Model (s) Rounded Difference
90 9.29 9.253 9.26 -0.03
100 10.13 10.125 13.13 0.00
110 11.00 11.005 11.01 +0.01
131.14 12.93 12.889 12.89 -0.04
140.28 13.75 13.710 13.71 -0.04
146.42 14.57 14.266 14.27 -0.30
158.56 15.42 15.376 15.38 -0.06
167.70 16.27 16.224 16.23 -0.04
176.84 17.12 17.082 17.09 -0.03
185.98 17.97 17.953 17.96 -0.01
200 19.32 19.313 19.32 0.00



Table: Raw 50 m and 100 m interval analysis of Michael Johnson's 200 m World Record.
50 m 100 m
Interval (m) Split (s) Interval Split
0 - 50 5.625 0 - 100 9.964
50 - 100 4.339 40 - 140 8.786
100 - 150 4.467 50 - 150 8.806
150 - 200 4.721 100 - 200 9.188



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Jonas Mureika 2002-06-12